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New microscope a game-changer for Melbourne eye surgery

The new surgical microscope at Epworth Freemasons in Melbourne is one of few being used Australia. Courtesy: 9news

Eye surgery is one of the most of delicate operations. Epworth Health ophthalmologist Elvis Ojaimi carries out up to 10 eye operations a week, usually on the macular which is responsible for central vision.

It is a very tiny area Dr Ojaimi told 9News.

The thickness of the macular is about 250 micrometres, which is a quarter of a millimeter.

Now Dr Ojaimi himself is able to see more clearly during surgery thanks to a new half a million dollar piece of technology.

It is something that I dreamed of 10 years ago and having it here does make a difference.

The new surgical microscope at Epworth Freemasons in Melbourne is one of few being used Australia.

The machine delivers a live cellular view deep into the eye.

This enables Dr Ojaimi to conduct microscopic repairs to tears, holes and damage to the retina and macular.

In real time it allows me to see things I can’t see with my own eyes.

Being able to see every layer, every bit of abnormal tissue.

The technology is delivering some remarkable results.

Melbourne grandmother Jenny Evans – who lost more than 50 percent of her sight to macular scarring – can now see clearly again following surgery.

It was amazing the difference Mrs Evans told 9News.

I had my eyesight back if not even better than I had before.

Jenny is back to 100 percent visions just six weeks following surgery,” said an elated Dr Ojaimi.

The Lumera 700 with OCT microscope was purchased for more than half a million dollars by the Epworth Medical Foundation. The foundation raises funds for state-of-the-art medical tech and research.

Source: https://www.9news.com.au/national/melbourne-news-elvis-ojaimi-epworth-health-freemasons-eye-surgery-health/7befc9b3-c20b-418a-be1b-625443544f1e