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Factory operators linked to four more

Thick smoke billows from the Campbellfield factory on Friday. Courtesy: 9news

An inferno at a waste management factory in Melbourne is continuing to burn amid revelations its owner is linked to four other warehouses stocked with toxic waste.

Crews are working this weekend to manage the fire at suburban Campbellfield, which started about 6.40am on Friday and sent a toxic black plume over Melbourne.

It was brought under control by midday on Friday but is expected to burn for days with two workers hospitalised, one of whom remains in an induced coma.

It comes as The Age reported that Bradbury Industrial Services controls illicit stockpiles of chemicals found at four other warehouses in March.

The news has sparked fears more fires could erupt.

The Campbellfield factory had been storing almost three times the quantity of chemical permitted, the EPA found.

Operators of the Campbellfield business had their licence suspended by the Environmental Protection Agency in March.

The company had been repeatedly found storing excess highly-flammable material.

The factory is allowed to hold a maximum 150,000 litres of waste material, including solvents, inks, paints and other flammable materials, before being processed.

Witnesses reported a number of explosions as the inferno spewed large volumes of black smoke.

Nearby businesses were forced to evacuate.

It took 175 firefighters to bring this blaze under control and 11 schools in this local area were shut down.

No students were attending school in this area yesterday and thick black toxic smoke blanketed most of the city.

One person was taken to hospital for an eye injury and another for burns, while some firefighters were also treated for heat stress.

Merlynston creek has been contaminated by run-off.

Victorian Coroner Darren Bracken attended the site on Friday and will investigate the cause of the blaze.

Premier Daniel Andrews said there were no suspicious circumstances.

Source: https://www.9news.com.au/national/news-melbourne-factory-fire-toxic-warehouse-waste-management/d17ed2e1-c1f2-4731-87cc-af9d73b3ee7a